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Jewish encyclopedia a descriptive record of the history, religion, literature and customs of the Jewish people from the earliest times to the present day by

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Published by Funk & Wagnalls in New York, London .
Written in English


Book details:

Edition Notes

In 12 vols.

StatementIsidore Singer, Projector and Managing Editor. Vol.9, Morawczyk-Philippson.
ContributionsSinger, Isidore, 1859-1939.
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL18467423M

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  The Jewish Encyclopedia Funk and Wagnells, is a magnum opus that outshines its successors of later generations. Concepts are carefully grounded in the Talmudic Roots they spring from. Key works defining Jewish disciplines such as Astrology are outlined by showing their original works in Hebrew, and tracing their influence as they are translated to Greek and /5(5). "The Newish Jewish Encyclopedia: From Abraham to Zabar's and Everything InBetween" is not exactly the truth of the book's contents. It is more an idiosyncratic list of people, places, things, and food, most of which add definition to the word "Jewish". The book was compiled by a group of three; Stephanie Butnick, Liel Leibowitz, and Mark Oppenheimer/5. "The Newish Jewish Encyclopedia: From Abraham to Zabar's and Everything InBetween" is not exactly the truth of the book's contents. It is more an idiosyncratic list of people, places, things, and food, most of which add definition to the word "Jewish"/5(40). The following divisions of the book are indicated in the text: (1) A group of discourses on the conduct of life (i.-ix.), comprising the praise of wisdom as the guide of life (i.-iv.); warnings against unchaste women (v.-vii.; with three misplaced paragraphs, vi.

The Jewish Encyclopedia, which recently became part of the public domain, contains o fully indexed articles and illustrations. This online version contains the unedited contents of the original encyclopedia. The Hebrew word is given by the author of the book as his name, sometimes with the article (xii. 8, and probably vii. 27), but ordinarily without it: similar license is allowed in Arabic in the case of some common nouns used as proper names. The author represents himself as the son of . The book receives its title from the name of its principal character, Judith (= "Jewess"; in the Greek transliteration, ἰουδείθ), a name found also in Gen. xxvi. 34 (comp. the corresponding masculine proper name in Jer. xxxvi. 14, 21, 23). The Book of Judith is a . Genesis of the Book of Daniel. Stories undoubtedly existed of a person by the name of Daniel, who was known to Ezekiel as a wise man. Tradition then ascribed to this wise man all the traits which Israel could attribute to its heroes.

The statement of Josephus ("Ant." x. 5, § 1) that Ezekiel wrote two books is entirely enigmatical. The doubt cast upon the authenticity of the book by Zunz, Seinecke, and Vernes has rightly never been taken seriously; but the authorship of several parts, such as iii. 16b, x. , xxiv. , and xxvii. Two eminent Jewish rabbis, Abraham ibn Ezra and Isaac Abravanel, were the first who showed a tendency to disintegrate the Book of Isaiah, but their subtle suggestion had no consequences. Practically, the analytic criticism of Isaiah goes back to Koppe, the author of the notes to the German edition of Bishop Lowth's "Isaiah" (). The canonical Book of Esther undoubtedly presents the oldest extant form of the Esther story. In times of oppression the Jews found comfort in this narrative, for it presented an example of sudden divine salvation in the days of distress (Esth. ix. 22, 28), and it strengthened their hope of being liberated from their desperate condition, especially in the days of the Maccabees. An Unorthodox Guide to Everything Jewish. Deeply knowing, highly entertaining, and just a little bit irreverent, this unputdownable encyclopedia of all things Jewish and Jew-ish covers culture, religion, history, habits, language, and more.