ecological role of coarse woody debris
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ecological role of coarse woody debris an overview of the ecological importance of CWD in BC forests by Victoria Stevens

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Published by British Columbia Ministry of Forests, Research Program in Victoria .
Written in English

Subjects:

  • Forest soils -- British Columbia.,
  • Forest litter -- Biodegradation -- British Columbia.,
  • Biodiversity -- British Columbia.,
  • Forest management -- British Columbia.

Book details:

Edition Notes

Includes bibliographical references.

StatementVictoria Stevens.
SeriesWorking paper / British Columbia Ministry of Forests -- 1997/30, Working paper (British Columbia. Ministry of Forests. Research Branch) -- 30.
ContributionsBritish Columbia. Ministry of Forests.
The Physical Object
Paginationvi, 26 p. :
Number of Pages26
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL17937059M

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G.G. Sass, in Encyclopedia of Inland Waters, Coarse woody debris (coarse woody habitat, large woody debris) is a natural feature of many lakes, rivers, and streams. This article provides an overview of (1) sources of coarse woody debris to aquatic ecosystems, (2) loss of coarse woody debris from aquatic ecosystems, (3) physical and hydraulic role of coarse woody . Get this from a library! The ecological role of coarse woody debris: an overview of the ecological importance of CWD in BC forests. [Victoria Stevens; British Columbia. Ministry of Forests. Research Branch.]. Coarse woody debris (CWD) is an important component of temperate stream and forest ecosystems. This chapter reviews the rates at which CWD is added and removed from ecosystems, the biomass found. Ecology of Coarse Woody Debris _____ Coarse woody debris is typically defined as dead standing and downed pieces larger than 3 inches in diameter (Harmon and others ), which corre-sponds to the size class that defines large woody fuel. Some ecologists include woody material larger than 1 inch in diameter as by:

  Coarse woody debris is an important structure and function unit in forest ecosystem. This review analyzed the ecological functions of coarse woody debris in forest ecosystem and introduced several hotspots and existing problems in coarse woody debris research field. It is suggested that quantitative research should be intensified in the ecological Cited by: Woody debris is an important, but often neglected component of manyterrestrial and aquatic ecosystems. Coarse woody debris (CWD), primar-ily in the form of standing dead trees and downed holes and large branches, is abundant in many natural forest and stream ecosystems,forming major structural features with many crucial ecological functions—as . Coarse woody debris (CWD), principally logs and snags, play a key role in a wide range of ecological processes in conifer forests. It is important for wildlife, plant regeneration, nutrient cycling, water quality and more (Maser et al. , Harmon et al. , Maser et al. ). Coarse woody debris is an important structure and function unit in forest ecosystem. This review analyzed the ecological functions of coarse woody debris .

(i.e., collections of coarse woody debris) in lakes and streams. Anthropogenic land-use change and habitat degradation can threaten the natural balance and ecological contribution of coarse woody debris to aquatic ecosystems. This article focuses primarily on the less understood role of coarse woody debris in lentic systems, and integrates and File Size: 1MB. Buy Ecological Bulletins, Ecology of Woody Debris in Boreal Forests on FREE SHIPPING on qualified orders Ecological Bulletins, Ecology of Woody Debris in Boreal Forests: Bengt Gunnar Jonsson, Nicholas Kruys: : Books. Coarse woody debris is a natural feature of many aquatic ecosystems and may play an important role in many ecosystem processes. For example, many ecosystem processes and organisms are dependent upon or evolutionarily adapted to the presence of coarse woody debris pools (i.e., collections of coarse woody debris) in lakes and streams. Accurate estimation of fine woody debris (FWD) population attributes (e.g., biomass) is a critical component of nationwide efforts to quantify carbon stocks and wildfire hazards. FWD can be defined as any piece of dead woody debris greater than cm and less than 10 cm in diameter and typically represents material such as tree and shrub.